Logical Deconstruction: A Danger in Decision Making

Consider how you answer the question, “Is this dangerous?” You pull from your past experiences, apply them as filters over the circumstance and begin breaking the problem down into a series of questions you can answer with “yes” and “no.”  To keep this discussion basic...let's just consider this as logic.
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You need basis to use logic. Consider this question:

Is it safe to mix 1cc of C2N14 with 5cc of LOx?

If you’ve never had chemistry, you may not be able to answer this. The symbols and language may not make sense, and because of your lack of basis, you cannot logically answer the question. This example illustrates how logic requires learning, and in absence of learning, our logic skills are diminished.

If our logic is only available where we have learned something in the past, then it is impossible for us to only use logic to fully make any number of decisions because we don’t know everything. 

The take away for today is this: Logic is formed by our experiences and past learning. Our logic is complementary, additive and adjusting. Our inability to answer logically does not diminish the value or consequence of the evaluation in front of us: the decision being evaluated carries weight and potential consequence whether we logically interact with it or not.

So, if you are a logic driven person, be cautious, accept that you can be wrong, and look for people who feel and know more than you to be your best friends!

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